Indiana high school makes significant upgrades to pump system

The new pump station was designed for ease of installation and a proficient transition from old system to new system.

 
When Arsenal Technical High School made the de­cision to upgrade an old submersible dry pit pump system, the Indianapolis, Ind.-based institution called upon Metropolitan Industries to renew its system through both effective and convenient means.

“Metropolitan built a triplex self-priming pump system that closed in a house and contained a gener­ator inside,” said national salesperson Tim Laskows­ki. “The packaged unit essentially sits on top of the existing wet well, which made the installation process very efficient.  All in all, the transition from the existing system to the new system was very convenient for the customer.”

Metropolitan removed the existing pumps that were no longer in function, left the wet well where waste collects, dropped the suction lines for the self-prim­ing pumps, and packaged it all up in one convenient unit.

The system, which is designed to collect sewage and transport it to the appropriate destination, start­ed out as a very small project that eventually turned large, incorporating a prefabricated steel building.

It total, Metropolitan supplied a complete station with pumps, motors, valves, fittings, wiring support bases and incidentals with the prefab­ricated steel building, which includes a simulated brick finish as an attractive design solution.  A total of three pumps, each with a TDH of 33 feet and a capacity of 500 GPM were supplied. An 80 kW generator was also included with the package.

Metropolitan manufactured the entire system on-site and shipped ready for installation.

 
One of the differences between this particular unit and alternative solutions for enclosed structures was the implementation of the imitation brick, which was chosen to match the surrounding campus of Arsenal Tech.

“The material we used was very thin, almost like sheets of plywood, and was routed to look like brick,” said Laskowski. “It provided a very nice design solution and complemented its surroundings very nicely.”

Laskowski said the construction of the program went smoothly and that the customer was ultimate­ly satisfied at the project’s conclusion.

“We actually had the engineers who specified the product at our facility in Romeoville, Ill.,” said Laskowski. “They were able to witness the construction process firsthand were very impressed by our work. We delivered and installed the new system without any problems.”

For more information please contact Tim Laskowski at 815-886-9200, ext. 255 or sales@metropolitanind.com.

Recent Control and Pump Repair Class a Success

Mike Schiazzano instructs seminar attendees during a recent “Control and Pump Repair 101” course hosted at Metropolitan Industries, Inc.

 
Part of our commitment to the industries we serve is sharing our expertise with engineers, water/wastewater operators, city officials and more by conducting educational seminars tailored to provide attendees a full understanding of both new and existing technologies.

Many of the seminars we conduct satisfy state requirements for continuing education and are completely free of charge.

We recently held a seminar developed to educate pump industry professionals entitled “Control and Pump Repair 101.”  Metropolitan’s Mike Schiazzano served as the course instructor and has been conducting the class for over 25 years.  Schiazzano, who has over 30 years of experience in the pump industry, said the course was developed to give attendees a basic understanding of a submersible pump and control panel, and to discuss basic troubleshooting of equipment.

“When we first started the class in the 1980s, it was primarily conducted in the field,” said Schiazzano. “Since then, we’ve moved it to our facility and interest has skyrocketed due to the fact we can offer a more in-depth course on-site.”

Schiazzano said that moving the course to Metropolitan’s Romeoville, Ill.-based facility has given attendees the ability to operate on both a submersible pump and control panel firsthand with the end goal of preparing them for everyday field work.

“Though this seminar is introductory in nature, we have attendees physically working with pumps and control panels, which provides depth they would not experience in a simple classroom setting,” said Schiazzano.  “We like to keep these classes limited to a small number of people so attendees can work with the equipment and the instructor one-on-one. The primary goal is for attendees to leave with a better understanding of equipment so if a problem does occur in the field, they’re prepared.”

Village of Wheeling, Ill. Utility Superintendent Jeff Wolfgram sent five members of the municipality to the recent course and said the village’s long-standing relationship with Metropolitan led to his decision to send the attendees.

Schiazzano demonstrates the workings of a control panel to Village of Wheeling, Ill. water operators.

 
“We’ve used Metropolitan to service our pumps and equipment, and have attended their seminars for years which has led to a sense of trust,” said Wolfgram.  “Municipalities often rely on their suppliers to introduce new technologies and Metropolitan has done just that over the years.”

Wolfgram said the “Control and Pump Repair 101” seminar provides distinct advantages over other forms of training largely because it’s hosted at Metropolitan.

“What’s great about the course is that equipment can be ‘troubleshooted’ in a controlled environment,” said Wolfgram.  “This type of setting can give attendees the ability to learn and experiment with equipment in a way they couldn’t in the field.”

Wolfgram said an overlooked benefit of Metropolitan seminars is the free price which can help attendees who may be facing a tight budget.

“Often times when municipalities are constructing a budget, training can get cut-out very quickly,” said Wolfgram. “The fact Metropolitan can not only provide worthwhile training for credit hours, but can do so at no charge is huge for us.”

While our “Control and Pump Repair 101” is designed to educate water operators, Metropolitan also offers courses designed for other professionals.

“The diversity among our seminars ensures anyone within the industries we serve can find something for them,” said Schiazzano.  “We have courses that offer continuing education units for water operators and plumbers, and professional development hours for engineers, but what’s most important is that attendees can count on learning valuable information they can apply to their profession when they attend a seminar.”

For more information regarding Metropolitan’s seminars, please call 815-886-9200 or visit www.ilceu.com.

Above Grade Solutions eliminate confined space procedures

By: Joseph Sanchez

According to the U.S. Dept. of Labor, many workplaces contain spaces considered “confined” because their configurations hinder the activities of employees who must enter, work in, and exit them. A confined space has limited or restricted means for entry or exit, and it is not designed for continuous employee occupancy. Confined spaces include, but are not limited to underground vaults, tanks, storage bins, such as those used in wastewater pumping applications.

Custom Designed Pumping Controls By Metropolitan Industries, Inc

Custom Designed Pumping Controls By Metropolitan Industries, Inc

OSHA uses the term “permit-required confined space,”  to describe a confined space that has one or more of the following characteristics: contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere; contains a material that has the potential to engulf an entrant; has walls that converge inward or floors that slope downward and taper into a smaller area which could trap or asphyxiate an entrant; or contains any other recognized safety or health hazard, such as unguarded machinery, exposed live wires, or heat stress.

The greatest danger facing the person entering a confined space is a lack of oxygen. Several breaths of an atmosphere holding less than 6 percent oxygen can disable in seconds and can kill in minutes. Either the volume percent of oxygen can be too little (less than 19.5) or other gases (such as carbon monoxide) in the confined space may interfere with the body’s uptake of an otherwise sufficient supply. Oxygen deficiency can also debilitate sensors: Thus, a space with very low oxygen levels can’t be tested for combustible gases since standard instruments for this purpose require oxygen to function. (The sensor actually attempts to ignite a sample of the atmosphere and can’t do so when the fuel/oxygen ratio is too high.)

Not only is it dangerous to operate in a confined space, but it is also costly and time consuming for municipalities to maintain according to Metropolitan Industries Service Manager Mike Schiazzano. He says a permitted confined space needs a minimum three-man crew with the following safety gear; two multi function gas monitors, tripod with safety retrieval line, safety harness, a fresh air blower, a fresh air tank with airline, respirator and escape pack. Training the crew to use all safety gear along with the retrieval equipment procedures is also an added requirement. He adds by eliminating the need to enter or work in a confined space a municipality can save time and money.

Solutions to Confined Space Applications

Above-grade applications eliminate the danger, costs and manpower issues associated with confined space applications. Installations typically consist of a small control and generator building installed next to wells below grade containing pumps. The pumps are easily accessible and can be easily removed and installed without entering well using guide rails.

Above Grade Stations Eliminate Confined Space Entry.

Costs and labor to maintain such an installation are minimal. Given that it is above grade and anything below grade is accessible from above, typically one person can operate the entire station reducing operating costs. Also further reducing cost is the elimination of the equipment and safety apparatuses associated with confined space entry.

Metropolitan Industries, Inc. specializes in the design and manufacture of above grade, lift station/control packages and recently completed two such jobs in Merrillville, Ind. that eliminated previous confined space applications.

Broadfield Lift Station

Working with Robinson Engineering and Contractor Hasse Construction, Metropolitan Industries, Inc. supplied a triplex, component lift station complete with a prefabricated building that houses the controls, valves and generator.

The triplex concrete lift station uses three, 50 HP, rated for a total 1442 gallons per minute (GPM) at 89.2 feet of total dynamic head (TDH). One submersible level transducer and four level switches control on, off, override and alarm levels in side the basin. Access hatches, a pump removal lift out system and guide rails allow easy access to pumps for maintenance without having to enter the 32’ basin.

To eliminate confined space entry, all controls, valves and a back up generator were housed in a prefabricated building measuring 19’ 3’’ long by 13’ 6’’ wide by 11’ tall building. The building itself was divided into two sections, one side for the controls and valves and the other side dedicated to just the generator.

On the control/valve side of the building, a triplex control panel with programmable logic controller and touch screen operator interface controls the system. The discharge pipe and valve assembly are located above grade inside the building for easy access.
The generator side of the building houses a Caterpillar 125kW, 3-Phase natural gas generator complete with accessories. A 400 amp automatic transfer switch allows for transfer to the generator during power outages.

Other features of the building include an HVAC system for climate control, high water alarm with dialer and battery back up, lighting and smoke detectors.

John Wood School Lift Station

The John Wood School Lift Station is another example of an above-ground application that eliminates confined space applications. This application called for a duplex component lift station again with a prefabricated control, valve and generator building.      The duplex concrete lift station uses two 40HP submersible pumps, rated for a total 700 GPM at 113’ TDH. One submersible level transducer and four level switches control on, off, override and alarm levels in side the basin. Two lift-out hydraulic sealing flange assemblies allow pump removal for maintenance and repair without entering the sump.

Just as the last example, all controls, valves and a back up generator were housed in a prefabricated building but this one measured 18’ long by 13’ 6’’ wide by 9’ tall. The building as well was divided into two sections, one side for the variable speed controls and valves and the other side dedicated to just the natural gas Caterpillar generator inside.

Other feature of the building include an HVAC system for climate control, high water alarm with dialer and battery back up, lighting and smoke detectors.

Conclusion

Above grade applications eliminate the dangers and costs associated with confined space procedures. Towns and villages save money by eliminating the special safety gear and reducing the personnel required by OSHA on a service call. Municipalities will save time by eliminating the requirement of obtaining a “confined space permit” that designates what is to be done, when and by whom. No longer will the local fire and police departments need to be involved as sometimes the permits dictate. As demonstrated a “permitted confined space” requires special handling, equipment and a fair amount of extra time and work if all the rules are followed. Eliminate these hurdles with an above grade application.