June 6, 2012

Metropolitan Supplies Equipment Upgrades to Lift Stations

At Metropolitan, we can supply all equipment needed to keep your pump station functioning as efficiently as possible.  Our adaptability and knowledge of new technologies give us the ability to supply the most cutting-edge equipment, which can extend the life of a system and save end users funds.

Metropolitan was recently chosen to supply all equipment associated with the upgrade of the existing stormwater and sanitary lift stations for the Joe Orr Road lift stations of Chicago Heights, IL.  The new lift stations include a number of up to date accessories and were housed in a large prefabricated concrete building.

The equipment supplied by Metropolitan was housed in a large prefabricated concrete building that included both a control room and a generator room.

Metropolitan’s Keith Girup said a number of factors contributed to the customer’s decision to make the upgrades.

“The project was done to replace an existing dry-pit type sanitary lift station that was over 30 years old,” said Girup.  “The design was chosen to eliminate the confined space environment as well as improve the operational efficiency, thus improving safety and reducing cost of daily operations.”

The stormwater lift station contains two Hydromatic model S4N300 submersible non-clog pumps, each with a capacity of 150 GPM at 20’ TDH.  Each motor is rated at 3 HP, 1750 RPM, 230 volts and 60 Hz.  One submersible level controller and five level switches to control on, off, override and alarm levels were also provided with the stormwater station.

The sanitary lift station contains two Hydromatic model S4MVX750 submersible non-clog vortex explosion pumps, each with a capacity of 375 GPM at 28.5’ TDH.  Each motor is rated at 7.5 HP, 1750 RPM, 230 volts, 60 Hz and are explosion proof at Class I, Division I, Group C and/or Group D locations.  One submersible level controller and five level switches to control on, off, override and alarm levels were also provided with the sanitary station.

The equipment supplied gave the customer the ability to operate both stations, creating a cost-effective solution for lift stations upgrades.

The prefabricated concrete building measures at 20’ L x 8’ W x 9’ H (outside dimensions).  The building is comprised of a 36” x 84” single door for the control room and a 72” x 84” double door for the generator room.  A Caterpillar 55 kW generator was also included.

Girup said the way in which the total system operates makes the application distinctive and efficient.

“This project is unique because the controls and generator are capable of operating the sanitary lift station as well as the nearby stormwater lift station,” said Girup. “By discussing the options and costs associated with also upgrading the stormwater lift station simultaneously with the sanitary lift station, the owner and engineer were able to make an educated decision to upgrade both lift stations and reap the benefits of twice the improved technology more cost effectively.”

Girup said Metropolitan’s involvement in the project can be attributed to a long standing relationship with the City of Chicago Heights, IL and project engineer.

“Metropolitan has been a trusted partner for the owner and engineer for many years and we were contacted at this projects’ inception,” said Girup. “We were instrumental in assisting with the design which included budget number preparation used for grant funding acquisition.”-

For more information please contact Keith Girup at 815-886-9200, ext. 264 or sales@metropolitanind.com.

June 30, 2011

Air-gap System critical component at Nuke Facility

Metropolitan Industries supplied a large air-gap break tank system that isolates processes from the source water feed for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

The Manhattan Project was the effort, led by the United States with participation from the United Kingdom and Canada, which resulted in the development of the first atomic bomb during World War II according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

The Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, was one of the main locations for the project due to its isolation and its proximity near the Columbia River, which could supply sufficient water to cool the nuclear reactors that produced plutonium during World War II.

The Hanford Site is now the focus of cleanup efforts which is the mission of Prime Contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company. They are tasked with cleaning up waste sites and treating contaminated groundwater to ensure a healthy future for the Columbia River. To accomplish this goal, CH2M HILL is currently working on groundwater treatment and remediation efforts under way through Hanford’s 100 area and Central Plateau, which includes a total of 11 groundwater operable units.

The task of this project is enormous with on-going efforts to remediate 39 waste sites and more than 250,000 tons of soil left behind by operations on the Hanford Site; installing 327 wells across the site that will extract, monitor, and remediate contaminated groundwater; and treating 625 million gallons of contaminated groundwater to slow further migration toward the Columbia River.

Metropolitan Industries, Inc. participated in the remediation process by supplying a large air-gap break tank system that isolates processes from the source water feed for the 200 W Pump & Treat facility at Hanford.

Working together with Project Engineer CH2M Hill located in Englewood, Co., University Mechanical Contractors located in Mukilteo, Wa., and Metropolitan Representative PumpTech, Inc located in Moses Lake, Wa., Metropolitan Industries supplied a custom-designed triplex, pressure booster system with air gap protection for the potable water supply, a 2,100 gallon tank with a system capacity rated for 580 gallons per minute.

“This is a large air gap system,” says Mike Tierney, national sales manager who oversaw design and production of this project. “We are always asked if we can build large air-gap systems and this is evidence that we can,” he said. According to Tierney, air-gap systems typically range anywhere from 100-200 gallons per minute. This system is triple that capacity at 580 gallons per minute.

Other features of the system include a U.L. listed control panel with intuitive operator interface and touch screen control. Metropolitan Industries is one of the few pump system manufactures with a U.L. control panel shop in-house. This capability reduces costs while increasing quality.

Prior to shipping, Metropolitan verified the system in their test lab to ensure precise operation in the field. With the added value of system testing, the contractor simply had to make their connections, which dramatically reduced their startup time.

Shipment of the large system occurred early second quarter of 2011. Metropolitan was pleased to be part of such an important environmental project. For more information about air-gap break tank systems, please contact Mike Tierney at 815-886-9200 ext 234.

June 23, 2010

Above Grade Solutions eliminate confined space procedures

By: Joseph Sanchez

According to the U.S. Dept. of Labor, many workplaces contain spaces considered “confined” because their configurations hinder the activities of employees who must enter, work in, and exit them. A confined space has limited or restricted means for entry or exit, and it is not designed for continuous employee occupancy. Confined spaces include, but are not limited to underground vaults, tanks, storage bins, such as those used in wastewater pumping applications.

Custom Designed Pumping Controls By Metropolitan Industries, Inc

Custom Designed Pumping Controls By Metropolitan Industries, Inc

OSHA uses the term “permit-required confined space,”  to describe a confined space that has one or more of the following characteristics: contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere; contains a material that has the potential to engulf an entrant; has walls that converge inward or floors that slope downward and taper into a smaller area which could trap or asphyxiate an entrant; or contains any other recognized safety or health hazard, such as unguarded machinery, exposed live wires, or heat stress.

The greatest danger facing the person entering a confined space is a lack of oxygen. Several breaths of an atmosphere holding less than 6 percent oxygen can disable in seconds and can kill in minutes. Either the volume percent of oxygen can be too little (less than 19.5) or other gases (such as carbon monoxide) in the confined space may interfere with the body’s uptake of an otherwise sufficient supply. Oxygen deficiency can also debilitate sensors: Thus, a space with very low oxygen levels can’t be tested for combustible gases since standard instruments for this purpose require oxygen to function. (The sensor actually attempts to ignite a sample of the atmosphere and can’t do so when the fuel/oxygen ratio is too high.)

Not only is it dangerous to operate in a confined space, but it is also costly and time consuming for municipalities to maintain according to Metropolitan Industries Service Manager Mike Schiazzano. He says a permitted confined space needs a minimum three-man crew with the following safety gear; two multi function gas monitors, tripod with safety retrieval line, safety harness, a fresh air blower, a fresh air tank with airline, respirator and escape pack. Training the crew to use all safety gear along with the retrieval equipment procedures is also an added requirement. He adds by eliminating the need to enter or work in a confined space a municipality can save time and money.

Solutions to Confined Space Applications

Above-grade applications eliminate the danger, costs and manpower issues associated with confined space applications. Installations typically consist of a small control and generator building installed next to wells below grade containing pumps. The pumps are easily accessible and can be easily removed and installed without entering well using guide rails.

Above Grade Stations Eliminate Confined Space Entry.

Costs and labor to maintain such an installation are minimal. Given that it is above grade and anything below grade is accessible from above, typically one person can operate the entire station reducing operating costs. Also further reducing cost is the elimination of the equipment and safety apparatuses associated with confined space entry.

Metropolitan Industries, Inc. specializes in the design and manufacture of above grade, lift station/control packages and recently completed two such jobs in Merrillville, Ind. that eliminated previous confined space applications.

Broadfield Lift Station

Working with Robinson Engineering and Contractor Hasse Construction, Metropolitan Industries, Inc. supplied a triplex, component lift station complete with a prefabricated building that houses the controls, valves and generator.

The triplex concrete lift station uses three, 50 HP, rated for a total 1442 gallons per minute (GPM) at 89.2 feet of total dynamic head (TDH). One submersible level transducer and four level switches control on, off, override and alarm levels in side the basin. Access hatches, a pump removal lift out system and guide rails allow easy access to pumps for maintenance without having to enter the 32’ basin.

To eliminate confined space entry, all controls, valves and a back up generator were housed in a prefabricated building measuring 19’ 3’’ long by 13’ 6’’ wide by 11’ tall building. The building itself was divided into two sections, one side for the controls and valves and the other side dedicated to just the generator.

On the control/valve side of the building, a triplex control panel with programmable logic controller and touch screen operator interface controls the system. The discharge pipe and valve assembly are located above grade inside the building for easy access.
The generator side of the building houses a Caterpillar 125kW, 3-Phase natural gas generator complete with accessories. A 400 amp automatic transfer switch allows for transfer to the generator during power outages.

Other features of the building include an HVAC system for climate control, high water alarm with dialer and battery back up, lighting and smoke detectors.

John Wood School Lift Station

The John Wood School Lift Station is another example of an above-ground application that eliminates confined space applications. This application called for a duplex component lift station again with a prefabricated control, valve and generator building.      The duplex concrete lift station uses two 40HP submersible pumps, rated for a total 700 GPM at 113’ TDH. One submersible level transducer and four level switches control on, off, override and alarm levels in side the basin. Two lift-out hydraulic sealing flange assemblies allow pump removal for maintenance and repair without entering the sump.

Just as the last example, all controls, valves and a back up generator were housed in a prefabricated building but this one measured 18’ long by 13’ 6’’ wide by 9’ tall. The building as well was divided into two sections, one side for the variable speed controls and valves and the other side dedicated to just the natural gas Caterpillar generator inside.

Other feature of the building include an HVAC system for climate control, high water alarm with dialer and battery back up, lighting and smoke detectors.

Conclusion

Above grade applications eliminate the dangers and costs associated with confined space procedures. Towns and villages save money by eliminating the special safety gear and reducing the personnel required by OSHA on a service call. Municipalities will save time by eliminating the requirement of obtaining a “confined space permit” that designates what is to be done, when and by whom. No longer will the local fire and police departments need to be involved as sometimes the permits dictate. As demonstrated a “permitted confined space” requires special handling, equipment and a fair amount of extra time and work if all the rules are followed. Eliminate these hurdles with an above grade application.

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